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  • Argonne forms two new divisions

Argonne forms new divisions to focus on computation and data science

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has formed two new research divisions to focus its lab-wide foundational expertise on computational science and data science activities. The new units — the Computational Science Division, led by Argonne Distinguished Fellow Paul Messina; and the Data Science and Learning Division, led by Argonne Distinguished Fellow Ian Foster — are part of Argonne’s overall advanced computing strategy to enhance lab-wide, cross-cutting capabilities to enable new scientific knowledge and insight in a wide range of disciplines.

November 10, 2017

The flat and the curious

Argonne researchers used ALCF computing resources to simulate the growth of the 2-D material silicene. Their work delivers new insights on the material’s properties and provides a predictive model for researchers studying other 2-D materials.

November 07, 2017
  • SC17 logo

Argonne researchers to play a major role at SC17

At SC17, more than 40 Argonne researchers will share their expertise and work in extreme-scale computing through a wide range of activities, including technical paper presentations, invited talks, workshops, panel discussions and tutorials.

October 31, 2017
  • Jupiter dynamo simulation

The inner secrets of planets and stars

An INCITE research team, led by Jonathan Aurnou of UCLA, is using Mira to develop advanced models to study magnetic field generation on Earth, Jupiter, and the Sun at an unprecedented level of detail. A better understanding of this process will provide new insights into the birth and evolution of the solar system, and shed light on planetary systems being discovered around other stars. Data from the Jupiter simulations will be compared to observational data from NASA’s Juno mission.

October 31, 2017
  • ALCF summer students

ALCF summer students gain real-world experience in scientific HPC

Every summer, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility, opens its doors to a new class of student researchers who work alongside staff mentors to tackle research projects that address issues at the forefront of scientific computing.

October 17, 2017
  • perovskite material

New material shows brain-like behavior

Even as the power of our modern computers grows exponentially, biological systems – like our brains – remain the ultimate learning machines.

October 09, 2017
  • Image by Argonne National Laboratory

Leaning into the supercomputing learning curve

Starting in late July, 70 participants in the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) gathered at the Q Center in St. Charles, Illinois, for the program’s fifth annual training session. This two-week course is designed to teach scientists key skills and tools and the most effective ways to use leading-edge supercomputers to further their research aims. The training is part of the Exascale Computing Project, a collaborative effort of the DOE's Office of Science and its National Nuclear Security Administration.

October 06, 2017
  • Isosurface of the Lapacian of the electron density of MK44, an organic dye, attached to the surface of a nanocluster of titania.

Argonne’s data science program adds new projects, doubles in size

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) added four new data science projects to its ALCF Data Science Program for 2017-2018.

October 02, 2017
  • Argonne's Sibendu Som

Turbocharging engine design

For the first time, Argonne’s scientists and engineers pinpointed engine designs for a given fuel using the Mira supercomputer at the heart of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility. With Mira’s supercomputing prowess, Argonne’s Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative (VERIFI) team simulated over 2,000 engine design combinations and “reduced design time from months to weeks,” said Sibendu Som, group leader and principal computational scientist at Argonne.

September 29, 2017
  • HACC cosmology simulation

Cartography of the cosmos

Argonne researcher Salman Habib leads the “Computing the Sky at Extreme Scales” project or “ExaSky,” one of the first projects funded by the recently established Exascale Computing Project (ECP), a collaborative effort between DOE’s Office of Science and its National Nuclear Security Administration. From determining the initial cause of primordial fluctuations to measuring the sum of all neutrino masses, this project’s science objectives represent a laundry list of the biggest questions, mysteries and challenges currently confounding cosmologists.

September 27, 2017

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